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Right to reply: new gTLD applicant hits back at my “delusional” comments

Kevin Murphy, July 14, 2020, 21:17:57 (UTC), Domain Policy

You may recall that I recently referred to Nameshop, a rejected new gTLD applicant, as “delusional” for attempting to get ICANN to grant it .internet to help fight the coronavirus pandemic.

I’ve not really pulled my punches reporting on the company’s attempts to get its rejected applied-for string, .idn, converted to .internet over the last few years. Nameshop is fighting a losing battle, I believe, and would be best served by pulling its application and getting a full refund.

Nameshop owner Sivasubramanian Muthusamy recently asked for a right to reply, and as that seemed like an easier option than getting into a pointless decade-long argument, I obliged.

Below the break, he tries to convince me and you that I’m wrong. Other than formatting, I’ve not edited it. Read it, and draw your own conclusions. Leave a comment if you wish.


By Sivasubramanian M

This brief article is primarily in response to the Domain Incite article about the Nameshop application for the .Internet Top Level Domain, titled World’s most deluded new gTLD applicant makes coronavirus pitch, and “Just give up!” ICANN tells its most stubborn new gTLD applicant, — but it is also in response to ICANN’s treatment of the Nameshop application.

Domain Incite has graciously allowed me the space here to respond, for which I am very thankful.

In reporting on the Nameshop proposal to delegate .internet in a way that can be used as a trusted communications space during the global pandemic, Domain Incite posits:

I don’t know whether Nameshop is motivated by a genuine desire to do good — as so many are during the pandemic crisis — or a sneaky strategy to shame ICANN into giving it its string change. Either way, the plan is pure delusion.

It is difficult for me to answer your question, because that would require a self-proclamation of merit, which by definition is something conferred, not claimed. However, I must seek in some way to dispel the doubts that you have expressed.

As Domain Incite has indicated in previous articles, Nameshop’s original application was for .IDN (more about that later). Although not finalized, the “IDN” moniker included a significant
element of usefulness and some sense of purpose with regard to making the Internet more accessible to all. There was always a sense of doing good. This goal was expanded and clarified in 2012 when the application was changed to .Internet and included Public Interest Commitments (that were ahead of the PIC process).

The inspiration for the original good and the idea to serve the Covid-fighting community is derived directly from my interactions with several good men and women who live purposeful
lives unseen and unknown, some of whom are involved in the Internet Governance processes.

A “sneaky strategy” would be the last thing to move them.

At this time of the COVID pandemic, some readings that came my way and my consultations encouraged the idea of a good deed to defer the business aspects of the .Internet application
and offer to utilise the TLD space with a near total focus on being of use in managing the crisis and to further use the TLD space for collaboration on renewal, with ample involvement from the ICANN Community. This is what Nameshop has offered. There is no delusion here.

Nameshop is not making a “pitch”; this is an idea to utilise the DNS for global benefit, one of the stated, yet unrealised goals of the new gTLD program.

As to Domain Incite’s characterisations of me as “most deluded” and “most stubborn”: I might be accepted to accept those descriptions if by “deluded,” you mean that I continue to believe
in the ICANN model and its propensity for doing good, and if you mean by stubborn, it is my persistence in not letting the idea of a purposeful TLD fall by the wayside.

Does my letter (pdf) reads like one that shames ICANN or instead like one that expresses a very high opinion of ICANN and deep trust in the ICANN Community? When Domain Incite and others next consider the Nameshop application, please understand that:

  • While Nameshop’s original application for .idn (disqualifiable because it is Indonesia’s country code) might be considered a mistake, consider that Google and Donuts made the same error (although it was not an existential mistake for them). This shows that the process was Byzantine even to the intellectual elites of our space – yet harmful only to
    entities the size of Nameshop.
  • While ICANN could have easily, immediately and appropriately informed me that .idn appeared on a list, ICANN took months to do so – timely response would have enabled Nameshop to correct the error at or almost at the time the application; Nameshop learnt about .idn being an alpha3 country code from others and informed ICANN, and requested to be allowed to change the string by the “Change Request” process which became an extended part of the application process.
  • After all the delays related processes of evaluation, and gaps in review processes that stymied substantive review, ICANN invited Nameshop to enter into an IRP, a review process prohibitively expensive and burdensome to be exercised by the type of applicant the new gTLD program supposedly encouraged; we have so far engaged in the cooperative engagement process. It is not our desire to engage in adversarial litigation on this matter.
  • A few other TLD applicants were permitted to change their string, after the “reveal day”. So, this issue is not black and white, it is a situation of ICANN being fair to many others but being selectively unfair concerning the string .Internet.

Where Domain Incite cites ICANN that there was, “careful review of the application,” that review was to verify if process routines were followed on paper, but with a firm resistance to
review the substance of the issue placed before ICANN. This is made clear in the various reports ICANN submitted where the reviewing parties did not perform a substantive review
either in its Board Reconsideration or even in the Ombudsman processes.

ICANN contends that it followed the due process, but following “a process” for the sake of documentation does not mean that “due process” was accorded. As observed by the Board
Governance Committee, “the reconsideration process does not allow for a full-scale review of a new gTLD application.” All of this amounts to a process severely limited by design, severely
limited in independence, and with limited notions of accountability.

Nameshop, as the applicant for the TLD .Internet, is not a large business corporation of a size typical of ICANN’s new application process. Nonetheless, Nameshop continues to contend that
it is well within ICANN’s processes to address these very process gaps to delegate .Internet; this has been an ongoing and amicable conversation.

One of the goals of the new gTLD program was to facilitate DNS usage and DNS usage for good in new areas of the globe. Delegating .Internet to Nameshop would achieve a significant milestone in ICANN’s new gTLD program. The current global health crisis amplifies ICANN’s role several fold, and in this context, Nameshop offers this proposal to present a clean TLD namespace to address multiple issues arising out of the pandemic situation, to use the space with a focus on being of help in managing the crisis, and more in causing ideas for renewal, not by Nameshop’s own strengths, but by the collective strengths and merits of the ICANN community.

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Comments (4)

  1. Even if the idea of the .internet is a good one, the new gTLDs have not yet managed to win over the public and have not presented security and a fair price.

    I believe that society will still have a greater preference for inheriting gTLDs and ccTLDs.

    On July 20, NIC.br will launch 2 extensions, which will make it compete directly with Google. They are: .app.br and .dev.br, which will have a fixed price, will not have a price increase and will be cheaper than Google extensions.

    CcTLD registries are able to compete with large applications for new gTLDs.

    Another example is .rio, which has less than 900 domains and .rio.br from NIC.br, which has almost 7 thousand domains and costs 8x less.

  2. Snoopy says:

    It’s a pity you had to post their turd response. Can I have those 2 minutes of my life back?

    • Kevin Murphy says:

      Of course you can mate. Simply remove all of the comments you’ve left here that I’ve had to read and approve, and I’ll have a word with God to refund you your time.

      Please note, the two minutes you’re going to get back are going to be the two minutes while you were blackout drunk vomiting into a urinal in a Torremolinos bar in 1997 while a transgender flamenco dancer stroked your hair.

      Not the best two minutes of your life, perhaps, but better than nothing!

  3. Nick Adams says:

    I read the whole reply in the Original Post above. I still not get why on the earth .Internet TLD will benefit anybody – individuals, businesses, etc. during this pandemic?

    IF anyone really wants to serve the community, they should apply for .Pandemic or such related type of TLDs, then offer domain registration at most negligible cost (say $1) to businesses/individuals affected by pandemic, or to organizations which are working to overcome such pandemic.

    I visited Nameshop site and read about their business plan for using .Internet tld. But suppose I’ve an IDN in “Science.Factory” (chinese) and other person has an IDN in “Science.Teacher” (tamil) then who will get the rights for “Science.Internet” TLD???

    Also .COM = .Internet for over 99% of the world population (considering they don’t know about TLDs and just type .COM at the end of any domain) So why another new TLD onboard? And .COM is already a global, established and recognized domain extension for 25+ years! So there’s no point in starting another .COM mimic and dilute the market!

    Pandemic will be ending soon! so the only motive of running a .Internet tld, if any, is to get as many as $$$$ from premium one-word, generic keyword registrations!

    So the idea itself is a BS.
    ICANN has taken right decision not to tolerate such stupid things!

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